Illegal imported GM products found on GM black market.

ricestick
The spread of illegal crops is pervasive where it appears that a rampant black market for these products exists. Global reports for 2013 of unauthorized crops are listed below which include their presence in chocolate cake. The detection of smuggled GM products is reported to the European Union rapid alert system for food and feed detection system and database, http://ec.europa.eu/food/food/rapidalert/index_en.htm

Switzerland – finds GM rice from China

In 2013, the Swiss authorities have so far made 4 notifications to the EU that they discovered unauthorized rice imported from China via Hong Kong.
26 August GM rice Bt63 in rice macaroni was withdrawn from the market RASFF No. 2013.1164
26 August GM rice Bt63 in rice sticks was withdrawn from the market. RASFF No. 2013.1165
2 September unidentified GM rice vermicelli was withdrawn from the market. RASFF No. 2013.1197
2 September unidentified ice sticks was withdrawn from the market. RASFF No. 2013.1198

Germany – unauthorized green papaya from Thailand.

In 2013 the German authorities have notified the EU on 9 separate occasions that unauthorized papaya (Carica papaya) had been identified.

22 April – RASFF No. 2013.0571
24 April – RASFF No. 2013.AUZ
3 May – RASFF No. 2013.0623
10 May – RASFF No. 2013.AXY
18 June – RASFF No. 2013.0859
3 July – RASFF No. 2013.0933
22 July – RASFF No. 2013.BIV
23 July – RASFF No. 2013.BIW
27 August -RASFF No.2013.1176

Finland – unauthorized rice powder

On the 26 August, the Finnish authorities notified the EU they had discovered unauthorized rice in powder. The product had originated in the China but was being imported to Finland from the United States. The product was identified by customs and detained at the border.

Belgium – Unauthorized papaya from Thailand.

In 2013, on 8 separate occasions, the Belgian competent authorities notified the EU they had discovered unauthorized GM papaya imported from Thailand.

4 April – RASFF No. 2013.0474
16 May – RASFF No. 2013.0681
14 June – RASFF No. 2013.0835
17 June – RASFF No. 2013.0851
2 July – RASFF No. 2013.BFP
3 July – RASFF No. 2013.BFR
5 July – RASFF No. 2013.0953
20 August – RASFF No.2013.1149

France – unauthorized frozen chocolate cake from China

On 13 August 2013, the French authorities notified the EU that they had discovered unauthorized ingredients in frozen chocolate cakes being imported from China. The cakes were seized at the border and were never on sale to the public.

France – unauthorized green papaya from Thailand

In 2013 the French authorities have made 5 notifications to the EU that they have discovered unauthorized papaya from Thailand.
4 July – RASFF No.2013.0947
4 July – RASFF No.2013.0949
9 July – RASFF No.2013.0968
12 July – RASFF No.2013.0991
8 August – RASFF No.2013.1100

Austria – unauthorized dried papaya from Thailand

On the 26th June 2013, the Austrian authorities notified the EU they had identified papaya being illegally imported into the EU. The Papaya had been imported from Thailand. According to the Austrian authorities the products had been withdrawn from the market and distribution was limited to Austria, RASFF No. 2013.0894

Belgium – Unauthorized papaya from Thailand.
In 2013, on 8 separate occasions, the Belgian competent authorities notified the EU they had discovered unauthorized GM papaya imported from Thailand.
4 April – RASFF No. 2013.0474
16 May – RASFF No. 2013.0681
14 June – RASFF No. 2013.0835
17 June – RASFF No. 2013.0851
2 July – RASFF No. 2013.BFP
3 July – RASFF No. 2013.BFR
5 July – RASFF No. 2013.0953
20 August – RASFF No.2013.1149

Germany – unauthorized rice Bt63

On the 12th of June 2013, the German Authorities notified the EU that it had identified unauthorized rice Bt63 in rice sticks being imported from China via Hong Kong. The consignment was detained at the border or Germany, RASFF No 2013.BDK.

South Africa – unlabelled baby food products containing maize

On the 5th of May 2013, the African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) released a statement showing results of tests conducted on 7 baby formulas and cereals

Purity’s Cream of Maize tested positive as containing 56.25% GM maize;
Purity’s Purity Baby First tested positive as containing 71.47% GM maize.
Purity is a baby food brand owned by Tiger Brands

Until 2011 in South Africa there was no obligation to label and provide consumers with information to make a choice. This changed in October 2011 when the Consumer Protection Act came into force.

According to the law, all foods containing 5% or more GM content must be labelled. Despite this law, only a handful of companies are beginning to label, the majority are not.

On the 26th of April, the Danish Authorities notified the EU that a companies own checks had identified unauthorized rice BT63 in animal feed imported from Pakistan.

Netherlands

So far in 2013, the Dutch Authorities have made the following reports to the EU:
23 January – rice cakes containing Cry1Ab from China were detained at the border (RASFF No.2013.AFO).
31st January – rice and peanut crackers containing Cry1Ab/Cry1Ac were detained at the border (RASFF No.2013.AHV).
31 January – rice and peanut crackers were detained at the border (RASFF No.2013.AHU).
31 January – Chinese rice crackers containing Cry1Ab/Cry1Ac were detained at the border (RASFF No.2013.AHT).
31 January – rice crackers containing CrylAb/CrylAc were detained at the border (RASFF No.2013.AHR).
25 January – rice crackers from China were detained at the border (RASFF No.2013.AGK).
4 February – Japanese-style rice crackers mix containing CrylAb/CrylAc were detained at the border (RASFF No.2013.AIS).
4 February – ramen noodles containing CrylAb/CrylAc were detained at the border (RASFF No.2013.AIR).
4 February – peanut ravioli containing CrylAb/CrylAc were detained at the border (RASFF No.2013.AIU).
4 February – ramen noodles containing CrylAb/CrylAc were detained at the border (RASFF No.2013.AJC).
4 February rice crackers containing CrylAb/CrylAc were detained at the border (RASFF No.2013.AIT).
7 February – oriental mix from China containing CrylAb/CrylAc was detained at the border (RASFF No.2013.AKM).
5 March – rice noodles containing CrylAb/CrylAc were detained at the border (RASFF No.2013.AOU).
5 March – rice noodles containing CrylAb/CrylAc were detained at the border (RASFF No. 2013.AOT).
5 March – rice cakes containing CrylAb/CrylAc were detained at the border (RASFF No.2013.AOR).
9 April – rice and peanuts crackers containing CrylAb/CrylAc were detained at the border (RASFF No.2013.ATG).

Greece – unauthorized papaya from Thailand.

On the 19th of April the Greek competent authorities notified the EU that it had detained dehydrated papaya from Thailand at its border because it was found to contain a sequence of DNA not native to papaya and commonly used in genetic modification (35S promoter).

Slovenia – finds rice in noodles from China

On the 28 March 2013, the Slovenian competent authorities notified the EU system they had detained a consignment of rice noodles from China as they were found to contain the gene sequences Cry1Ab/Ac-sybr, tNOS-sybr, RASFF No. 2013.ARR

Namibia – Three popular maize products contaminated with GMOs

In February 2013, the Namibian Consumers Trust published its findings showing the contamination of 3 consumer maize products which had been found to contain maize.

The samples were collected by the Namibia Consumer Trust and sent to South Africa for testing. They found:
Ace contained 56.82% maize
White Star contained 2.75% maize
Top Score contained 1.09% maize
NB: Ace is imported from South Africa the only African state that explicitly allows the commercial cultivation of maize. This explains the far higher contamination levels

The Namibian Agronomic Board (NAB) has reprimanded those responsible for producing and marketing maize products that contain maize, despite a general ban on these products.

In a telephone interview, CEO of the Agronomic Board, Christoph Brock informed the Economist that the Board does not in any way support the production of modified maize as these substances are banned.

Namibia adopted a Biosafety Act in 2006 which governs the use of crops, feed and foods. The objective of the Biosafety Act no.7 of 2006 is to introduce a system and procedures for the regulation of in Namibia.

Namibia is party to the Cartagena Protocol on Biosafety to the Convention on Biological Diversity, and is supposed to have some form of control over the presence and use of foods and other products.

The Cartagena Protocol is an international agreement which aims to ensure the safe handling, transport and use of living modified (LMOs) resulting from modern biotechnology that may have adverse effects on biological diversity, also taking into account risks to human health.

As Namibia is party to this protocol, it has drafted and passed the Biosafety Act, which governs the use of , feed and foods. However, the commencement date has not yet been gazetted, hence some producers could be using the excuse to sneak in GMOs in their production.

Although the law is not yet in place, most Namibians are under the impression that GMOs are not allowed in the country and if allowed should be labelled as such

Romania – finds insect resistant corn in popcorn.

On 8 February 2013, the Romanian authorities notified the EU that they had identified Bt176 corn in popcorn from Egypt. Bt176 is a variety of maize/corn (Zea mays) produced and owned by Syngenta.

It has been developed to be resistant to the European corn borer insect by using the Cry1Ab gene sequence, derived from Bacillus thuringiensis. It is also resistant to the herbicide glufosinate ammonium (trade names include Basta and Liberty).

BT176 was on of the first crops to be commercially grown in the USA. In 1997 it was given a consent for cultivation and for Food and Feed use in the EU. However, following a decade of controversy the consent lapsed in 2007 and has not been renewed.

Italy – unauthorized popcorn from Argentina

On 4 January 2013, the Italian authorities notified the EU that they had identified the unauthorized GM maize in pop corn imported from Argentina.

The GM maize was identified as Bt176 which contains the Cry1Ab gene making it tolerant to insect attack, the pat gene conferring insect resistance and the bla gene conferring resistance to the antibiotic ampicillin.

Maize line Bt176 was authorized for use in the EU on 1 January 1997 but was not renewed in 2007 and so is no longer authorized for use.

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