Immune system directly connected to brain

brain imagingThe University of Virginia School of Medicine has published a new ground breaking study in the Nature journal revealing that the brain is directly connected to the immune system. The brain is connect to the immune system by brain lymphatic vessels.

The vessels were detected after the researchers used a method to mount the brain membranes of a mouse. Previously the entire brain membrane had not been thoroughly analyzed and researchers are already examining the impact this may have on a range of neurological diseases from Alzheimer’s disease to .

“Instead of asking, ‘How do we study the immune response of the brain?’ ‘Why do patients have the immune attacks?’ now we can approach this mechanistically. Because the brain is like every other tissue connected to the peripheral immune system through meningeal lymphatic vessels,” said Jonathan Kipnis, PhD, professor in the UVA Department of Neuroscience and director of UVA’s Center for Brain Immunology and Glia (BIG). “It changes entirely the way we perceive the neuro-immune interaction. We always perceived it before as something esoteric that can’t be studied. But now we can ask mechanistic questions.”

“We believe that for every neurological disease that has an immune component to it, these vessels may play a major role,” Kipnis said. “Hard to imagine that these vessels would not be involved in a [neurological] disease with an immune component.” “The first time these guys showed me the basic result, I just said one sentence: ‘They’ll have to change the textbooks.’ There has never been a lymphatic system for the , and it was very clear from that first singular observation — and they’ve done many studies since then to bolster the finding — that it will fundamentally change the way people look at the ’s relationship with the immune system.”

The discovery that the brain is connected to the immune system by lymphatic vessel has opened up new possibilities for treating neurological diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. “In Alzheimer’s, there are accumulations of big protein chunks in the brain,” Kipnis said. “We think they may be accumulating in the brain because they’re not being efficiently removed by these vessels.”

Source

Antoine Louveau, Igor Smirnov, Timothy J. Keyes, Jacob D. Eccles, Sherin J. Rouhani, J. David Peske, Noel C. Derecki, David Castle, James W. Mandell, Kevin S. Lee, Tajie H. Harris, Jonathan Kipnis. Structural and functional features of lymphatic vessels. Nature, 2015; DOI: 10.1038/nature14432

Be Sociable, Share!

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *