New GMO Vanilla extract raises concerns.

vanillabeanA new product is being developed to be released in 2014. The product, called Synbio vanilla, will replace the vanilla bean as the preferred flavor enhancing material with a synthetically produced vanilla extract produced through genetic modification of yeast. The vanilla bean extract market is a multi-billion with the extract used in millions of food products, including ice cream, and the company wishes to tap into a lucrative market potential.

A Switzerland based biology company, Evolva, entered into a 4 year agreement with the Danish Government’s council for strategic to develop a commercially viable and environmentally acceptable production route for biosynethic production of vanillin. The genetically modifed vanillin is developed by using genetically modified yeast which has been created to develop a new developmental pathway from glucose in two yeast strains modified with bacterial, mold, plant and .

The problem with this is once again safety, where the safety of the genetically modified vanillin product has not been determined for large scale by humans or in any capacity. In light of the new that is constantly coming to light concerning the effects of DNA manipulation and the ability of DNA to respond to environmental influences including nutrition safety of any genetically modified product safety should be of paramount concern and should be addressed by the relevant regulatory agency.

Source

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