Research finds that Vitamin C kills drug resistant TB mycobacteria.

Researchers at Albert of Yeshiva University have determined that vitamin C kills drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) bacteria in a laboratory setting. The study was published in in the online journal Nature Communications and suggests that vitamin C added to existing could shorten .

TB is caused by infection with the bacterium M. tuberculosis. The World Health organization estimated that TB sickenes some 8.7 million people and killed 1.4 million people. Infections that fail to respond to are a growing problem: About 650,000 people worldwide now have multi-drug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), 9 percent of whom have extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB).TB is especially acute in low and , which account for more than 95 percent of TB-related deaths, according to World Health Organization estimates.

The Einstein discovery arose during research that delved into how become resistant to isoniazid, a potent first-line TB drug. The lead investigator and senior author of the study was , Jr. Ph.D., professor of microbiology & immunology and of genetics at Einstein. Dr. Jacobs is a investigator and a recently elected member of the National Academy of Sciences.

Dr. Jacobs and his colleagues observed that isoniazid-resistant were deficient in a molecule called mycothiol. “We hypothesized that that can’t make mycothiol might contain more cysteine, an amino acid,” said Dr. Jacobs. “So, we predicted that if we added isoniazid and cysteine to isoniazid-sensitive M. tuberculosis in culture, the bacteria would develop resistance. Instead, we ended up killing off the culture— something totally unexpected.”

The Einstein team suspected that cysteine was helping to kill by acting as a “reducing agent” that triggers the production of reactive (sometimes called free radicals), which can damage DNA.

“To test this hypothesis, we repeated the experiment using isoniazid and a different reducing agent— vitamin C,” said Dr. Jacobs. “The combination of isoniazid and vitamin C sterilized the M. tuberculosis culture. We were then amazed to discover that vitamin C by itself not only sterilized the drug-susceptible TB, but also sterilized MDR-TB and XDR-TB strains.”

To justify testing vitamin C in a clinical trial, Dr. Jacobs needed to find the molecular mechanism by which vitamin C exerted its lethal effect. More research produced the answer: Vitamin C induced what is known as a Fenton reaction, causing iron to react with other molecules to create reactive that kill the .

“We don’t know whether vitamin C will work in humans, but we now have a rational basis for doing a clinical trial,” said Dr. Jacobs. “It also helps that we know vitamin C is inexpensive, widely available and very safe to use. At the very least, this work shows us a new mechanism that we can exploit to attack TB.”

Source

Vilche C, Hartman T, Weinrick B, Jacobs Jr WR. Mycobacterium tuberculosis is extraordinarily sensitive to killing by a vitamin C-induced Fenton reaction. Nature Communications. 2013.
Read more at http://www.medicaldaily.com/articles/15756/20130521/vitamin-c-antibiotic-resistant-bacteria-mycobacterium-tuberculosis.htm#cfW4ELAEpDZfIMVg.99

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