Sri Lanka bans glyphosate.

srilanka is the found in ’s . The move by President Mahinda Rajapaksa came as a result of a new published study by Dr. Channa Jayasumana, who linked with a combination of heavy metals found in drinking water to chronic disease.

The disease is currently the leading cause of death of men in the agricultural region. acts as a carrier or a vector of these heavy metals to the ,” said Dr. Channa Jayasumana, the study’s principal author.

Wednesday’s announcement by Sri Lanka was the most dramatic measure taken to date in the region to combat the illness. El Salvador approved a ban on dozens of agrochemicals including last September.

“An investigation carried out by medical specialists and scientists has revealed that disease was mainly caused by ,” Special Projects Minister S.M Chandrasena told reporters in Sri Lanka. “President Mahinda Rajapaksa has ordered the immediate removal of from the local market soon after he was told of the contents of the report.”

The premise of Jayasumana’s research centers around the fact that , which forms powerful chemical bonds with heavy metals, enters into compounds that persist in drinking water until they break down in people’s kidneys. The population is placed at risk by the combination of heavy water and or other products.

“I think we can explain the geographical distribution as well as the time problem with our ,” Jayasumana said, in reference to the epidemic’s unusual geography and its surge in all of the affected regions during the 1990s.

Jayasumana maintains that was originally patented as a chelating agent and failed in its obligations to warn the public of the risks posed by and its capacity to bind to heavy metals when used in areas with heavy water.

Source

http://foodexposed.co.za.www100.jnb2.host-h.net/another-study-links-global-kidney-disease-to-roundup/

Public Integrity

Channa Jayasumana, Sarath Gunatilake, and Priyantha Senanayake. , Hard Water and Nephrotoxic Metals: Are They the Culprits Behind the Epidemic of Chronic Disease of Unknown Etiology in Sri Lanka? Int. J. Environ. Res. 2014, 11(2), 2125-2147; doi:10.3390/ijerph110202125

Be Sociable, Share!

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *