Taste Gene identified in Children.

tastegeA team of researchers from the have identified a taste gene which influences taste sensitivity in children. The gene accounts for individual differences in food selection and taste preferences.

The findings may help to explain why some children are more attracted to sweet-tasting foods, as well as why taste and appear to change with age.

“The is an important determinant of what children eat. We know that young children eat what they like. We also know that many children do not like , thereby interfering with and potentially limiting intake of important nutrients,” comments lead author Julie Mennella, PhD, a developmental . “The recent award demonstrates the importance of the identification of genes coding for taste and olfactory receptors. We took advantage of this new knowledge to look at how variation in taste genes might relate to the taste likes and dislikes of .”

Researchers contrasted sensitivity and food-related behaviors across three genotypes of the TAS2R38 gene, which encodes a taste receptor responsive to .

Researchers classified 143 into three groups based on their TAS2R38 genotype: Type AA had two bitter-insensitive sites (alleles), type PP had two bitter-sensitive alleles, and type AP had one of each.

In order to provide a behavioral measure of sensitivity to , children – who were between 5 and 10 years of age – and mothers categorized three concentrations of a bitter-tasting compound (; PROP) as tasting either “like water” or “bitter or yucky.”

Having a bitter-sensitive allele (P) on the TAS2R38 predicted sensitivity to the of PROP in both children and mothers. While 70% of children and 50% of mothers with either AP or PP alleles detected bitterness in the weakest PROP solution, the same solution tasted bitter to only a few individuals with two bitter-insensitive alleles (AA).

Children and adults with two bitter-sensitive alleles (PP) were more sensitive to than those with just one (AP).

Genetic influences on sensitivity were in some cases modified by age. In individuals with the mixed AP genotype, children were more sensitive to bitter than adults, with 64% of children but only 43% of adults able to detect bitterness in the weakest PROP solution.

“This type of information will one day help to improve the diets of our children by allowing us to devise better strategies to enhance fruit and vegetable acceptance in children who are sensitive to ,” comments Mennella. “It may be that childhood represents a time of heightened sensitivity in some children, which lessens with age. Such a scenario would account for the increase of that often occurs as children mature into adulthood. This is definitely an area that merits more research.”

Children’s sweet preference was predicted by the bitter receptor genotype. Children with a bitter-sensitive allele (PP or AP) preferred higher concentrations of sucrose solutions than did bitter-insensitive (AA) children, and were more likely to identify carbonated drinks as a preferred beverage. They also were less likely to name milk or water as one of their two favorite beverages. Favorite cereals and beverages of PP children had higher sugar content than corresponding selections of AA children.

The effects of the taste gene were limited to children as the bitter receptor genotype did not influence sweet preference in adults. Instead, effects of race/ethnicity were the strongest determinants.

Some mothers and their children may live in different sensory worlds due to differences of taste sensitivity related to genes, age, or both. Such differences influenced interactions between mothers and children: mothers insensitive to perceived bitter-sensitive children as being more emotional than bitter-insensitive children. “This knowledge may bring relief to parents who learn that their children reject foods that they themselves like because of inborn differences in taste ability, rather than rebelliousness or defiance of authority,” explains Reed.

Source

Julie A. Mennella, M. Yanina Pepino, and Danielle R. Reed. Genetic and environmental determinants of bitter perception and sweet preferences. Pediatrics, 2005, 115 (2), e216-e222.

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